The three best back exercises to do at home

Here are the three best back exercises to do at home. The Sundial chiropractors and physio’s here in Brighton, have 4 decades of experience treating back pain successfully and have found that these simple exercises, that only take a few minutes a day, really help a bad back. Start with the easy ones and gradually build up doing the exercises for longer and longer. If you experience any pain beyond a mild discomfort then stop and go back to an easier exercise. If pain persists then seek help from a healthcare professional.

One of the easiest ways to treat back pain yourself is to do more exercise. But you have to do the right type of exercises. Do the wrong ones and you could make the pain a lot worse!
So what are the wrong sort of exercises for a bad back? Deadlifts, sit-ups (if done wrong) and touching your toes are common culprits. More about that here.
Fortunately, there is a series of simple, safe and effective exercises that can make a big difference if you have chronic back pain.

Our go-to exercises for back pain are:

  • Side Plank
  • Modified Sit-up
  • Bird Dog (sometimes called the Superman)
  • Dead Bug (extra bonus!)

These exercises target the abdominal core muscles as well as the back muscles to provide strength and stability to most back problems.

As with all new exercises, start gently and gradually build up. If you go at it too hard to start with you can irritate already sore muscles and joints and you will get fed up with these wonderful back exercises very quickly. As a guide, if pain or discomfort on doing the exercise is above a four out of ten – stop – go back to an easier version.

What makes an exercise harder?
Obviously doing more repetitions makes the muscles work harder. So start with five reps.
Doing theses back exercises slowly is often harder as the core muscle have to balance your body for a longer time. Also making your body more unstable increases the impact on the core muscles. You can see this in the two versions of the Bird Dog exercise. The easy one moves one arm or leg at a time but the harder one moves an opposite arm and leg together whilst your weight is supported at just two points. People with chronic back pain often find this exercise quite difficult. If that is you, do the easy one first until you are more confident.
Increasing the load or weight lifted increases the work but these exercises are with your own bodyweight so that is not really an issue.
Give these exercises a go but if you are experiencing consistent pain and live or work in Brighton then come in to see us by booking online above or give us a call for a consultation. It’s free. We solve back pain with a tried and tested three-step process:

1 Consultation      2 Diagnosis      3 Treatment

Sundial at the Brighton Half Marathon 2020

Here are the runners who braved 50 mph winds to complete the Brighton Half Marathon 2020. Sore but proud! Thanks to the fantastic physio students and massage therapists who took care of the runners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Achilles tendon pain – Step by Step Guide to Recovery

In the first article, we looked at the causes of Achilles pain and what tendinopathy is. To read it click here.

Now we look at how you can help yourself.

Step 1 – Load Management

Can I carry on running?  The answer is potentially, yes.  First establish how severe your pain is, using the Pain Measurement Scale to monitor your pain: 

Up to a 4 should be a comfortable/normal training zone and should not aggravate the symptoms as long as you don’t go mad! If you are finding it hard to settle your symptoms down, then 1-2 weeks rest from activities that aggravate your symptoms may be a good idea.

24 Hour response to tendon load

Remember tendons can take 24 hours to respond to load, so monitor the response of your exercise.  Above a 4/10 pain, then your exercise might have been too much! If this is the case, try resting for a few days then try again if the pain has settled. 

If you plan to keep running or exercising, try to keep your pain levels in a comfortable zone. Note how far you can run or exercise before the pain comes on or gets worse.  0-4/10 pain should be your marker for this. Above this zone, it’s probably a good idea to rest a little longer or switch to non-aggravating exercise such as swimming or cycling.

With insertional tendinopathy, you may be able to keep exercising by avoiding the compression element to the Achilles i.e. switch from hill running to flats.

 

Step 2 – Pain Management

Anti-Inflammatory medication can be useful in the reactive stage of the injury.  Medication such as ibuprofen can be useful as it reduces pain and decreases tendon swelling.  Before considering any medication, please consult your GP or pharmacist first.

Ice may be useful, especially in the initial stages of the injury or after exercise.  Try using an ice pack and placing the painful point directly onto the pack with the weight on the lower limb resting on the ice for 10-15min.  Watch out for ice burns! Try using a light towel over the ice if you’re sensitive to this.

Kinesiology tape can be a useful way of managing pain and can help you to exercise with less aggravation. Rocktape and KT tape are the best brands – cheaper options in my opinion don’t seem to work as well.  Kinesiology tape works by creating less compression on the painful area and helps the Achilles tendon feel protected, providing sensory feedback to the brain. When using this tape at Sundial here in Brighton, patients will often return saying, “I have no idea how this stuff works but it really helped”. Placebo can be a powerful healing tool, so if it works for you, don’t knock it!

Achilles Self Tape Technique Video to follow soon

 

Step 3 – Self Management

Footwear can make a big difference to anyone suffering from an Achilles tendinopathy. Making sure you have a supportive shoe that also provides you with cushioning will improve your gait and potentially cause less aggravation to your Achilles tendons.  

Having a gait analysis if you’re a runner can also be a great way of identifying areas of weakness and poor running technique that could lead to injury.  Here at Sundial, we offer a gait analysis session at our Kemptown clinic, so if this is something you’re interested in, please get in contact with us. 

Reducing muscle tension

Reducing muscle tension in the structures around the Achilles can be a great way of creating less tension which could impact on your symptoms.  Using a foam roll or tennis ball to self-massage your calf muscles and plantar fascia under your foot will help to reduce tension and help to prevent further injury.

Increase ankle joint range of movement

Often reduced ankle range of movement on the non-affected side can be contributing factor to Achilles tendinopathy. The inability to push off from one foot can lead to muscle imbalance and overuse on the other side.  Reduced ankle range of movement is very common after an ankle sprain, which is why improving ankle range of movement is an important part of any physio rehab programme for Achilles tendinopathy.

Strength

A study with 26,610 participants by Lauersen in 2013 looked at the effectiveness of exercise interventions to prevent sports injuries. It found that overuse injuries could be almost halved with strength training alone.  This study, along with lots of other research, is why exercise is the number one treatment modality used by physiotherapists all around the world.  

I believe that most overuse injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy can be overcome with some simple strength and conditioning exercises.  Below is a list of videos designed to help you manage and prevent this condition. However, it’s important you select the right exercise for your type and phase of your Achilles tendinopathy.


Achilles tendinopathy exercises

Do these exercises daily at least once. If you skip a day, don’t worry. Don’t do double the next day as this can overload the healing tendons and muscles. 


Easy Achilles Tendinopathy exercises

If you have a suspected Achilles tendon pain then start with these easy exercises. These simple exercises use isometric muscle contraction to gently load the Achilles tendon to stimulate repair. If you go to the more advanced exercises before you are ready you can easily make things worse and slow down your recovery. If your pain is 4 or more on doing these exercises you are not ready for these. See me and get some physiotherapy.

Intermediate Achilles Tendinopathy exercises

This series of progressively harder exercises use slightly harder eccentric muscle contraction exercises to accelerate healing and build strength in the tendon. Don’t do these if you cannot do the Easy ones without your pain going above a 4. Don’t cheat by skipping this step!

Advanced Tendinopathy exercises

This video has a range of progressively harder advanced exercises consisting of concentric and eccentric muscle contractions to gain maximum benefit. You should be able to do the intermediate exercises without pain above a 4 on the scale above. If you have a pain level of 4 or more then you are not ready for these exercises and could hurt yourself more.

Physiotherapy

If in doubt…best to get it checked out!  Physiotherapy will help you to understand the root cause of your symptoms. Often with Achilles pain, there is more than one issue leading to your injury.  During the first consultation, we will assess your functional ability looking at balance, strength, flexibility and range of movement. From this assessment, we can formulate a treatment plan specific to your needs and goals.  

During your initial assessment, you have the option to have treatment such as massage, acupuncture, low-level laser therapy and taping, all of which can help to improve your symptoms and reduce pain. After the treatment phase, you will be given some exercises for you to practice at home which will help you to manage your condition and begin your rehabilitation back to normal activity.

Sundial Clinics offers a free physiotherapy assessment to anyone who would like advice about an injury. This session is a great way to get some useful tips on how best to manage your injury and to see if physiotherapy is right for you.  Why not call the clinic today to arrange a free consultation and stop that niggle turning into a pain!

Part one covered what types of Achilles tendinopathy there are and the causes.

James Masterson
Physiotherapist

Related video

 

Get started today with a free consultation…

Book now

Recent Posts on Sports Injuries …

  • Brighton Half Marathon runners’ offer 5th February 2020 The Brighton Half Marathon is in just over two weeks time and we are entering a team as well as sponsoring the event with our Massage Tent. It might be a bit late to enter if you don’t run regularly as one of our previous team members found out. Becky had never attempted 13.1 miles ...
  • Runners MOT – Brighton Half Marathon 20th January 2020 Running injuries often start with a niggle. Knee pain, muscle strain, tendon pulls, bursitis, ligament sprains and all sorts of other aches and pains are a constant reminder that marathon training and actually running it can be a hazardous business. Many people who enter for the Grand Brighton Half Marathon will not complete it because ...
  • Achilles tendon pain – Step by Step Guide to Recovery 20th January 2020 Achilles tendon pain - Step by Step Guide to Recovery
  • Achilles tendon pain? Which type do you have? 4th December 2019 Achilles tendon pain? Which type do you have?
  • Brighton half marathon recovery tips: how to manage an acute injury 18th November 2019 Brighton half marathon recovery tips: how to manage an acute injury
  • Brighton Half Marathon runners’ offer 27th February 2019 After running the Brighton Half Marathon on Sunday you may still be getting muscle soreness or other aches and pains. Simple muscle soreness will get better over the next few days and massage can help speed this up. If you have a more persistent or painful niggle then you probably want to know whats wrong ...
  • How to manage an acute injury yourself 29th February 2016 “As a physiotherapist this is a question I get asked a lot and having just completed the Brighton Half Marathon you may be asking the yourself the same question.” says Sundial physio James Masterson.  He goes on to say “So in order to help you with your post run recovery here’s a few useful tips to ease you back ...
  • Great stretches for running 10th February 2016 Stretching may help reduce injury and improve flexibility in runners. Most runners include stretches in their routine. It is important to prepare your muscles for a run by gently warming up and keep flexible by doing these stretches. These exercises put together by our physio can help stretch the main running muscles. These stretches should be ...
  • Do I need orthotics for running? 4th December 2014 Why would I need orthotics? Although running shoe design and technology has progressed leaps and bounds over recent years, there are certain foot types that will require more support, explains James Masterson, physio here at Sundial, Brighton.  However not everyone will benefit from orthotics and it’s important to gain professional advice before deciding on whether an orthotic is ...
  • Running shoes – top tips for the marathon season from Brighton physio 27th November 2014 If like me you’re considering starting your preparation for the up and coming marathon season then take a look at my top tips for staying injury free and completing the 26.2 miles with a smile on your face says James Masterson,  a physiotherapist here at Sundial, Brighton. Which running shoe shall I buy? Inappropriate footwear is the root ...

5 predictions for the future of back pain treatment

Brighton chiropractor examines backBack pain is a global menace. It is the biggest cause of disability worldwide; it affects whole economies, individuals’ health and makes lives a misery. Back pain contributes to obesity, diabetes, osteoarthritis and mental health issues as those with back pain cannot exercise as much as they would wish. The 2020s should see major advances in back care.

Despite not getting the attention or funding that conditions like Alzheimers and cancer receive, there are exciting developments in treatment, policy and back research which will change how we approach back pain over the next decade.

 

 

 

1. Artificial discs 

Once a thing of science fiction, man-made discs are looking like a reality. As we get older the discs of the spine wear and although this is mostly painless, in some people it can cause extensive osteoarthritis, nerve or spinal cord entrapment and pain. Not nice!

The standard treatment, if people are beyond chiropractic care, is an operation to remove the old disc and then the adjacent vertebrae are fused together. It doesn’t have a great success rate and complications are high not least of all by accelerating the wear on the other discs in the area.

Primitive artificial discs and cages have been tried surgically but don’t have the strength and mobility that a healthy spine requires. The latest innovation is to inject stem cells into an artificial polymer gel matrix in the lab and top and tail it with foam – mimicking a real disc. These discs have been transplanted into goats successfully and initial reports are that they perform as well as normal discs. You can watch the video – click here.

Whilst the researchers have yet to carry this out in humans it is a huge step in the right direction.

2. Stopping ineffective and dangerous drugs to treat back pain

A class of painkilling drug is increasingly being prescribed, including for back pain despite being ineffective for this sort of pain and is so dangerous that it can kill. In the USA, where the problem is much worse, more than 70,000 people a year are dying from a prescribed opioid class drug. In recent years Tom Petty and Prince died from these legal drugs which are often many times more powerful than heroin. In the UK, figures are harder to come by but in 2018 one drug alone, tramadol, was implicated in 220 deaths. There are many others which go by names such as dihydrocodeine, codeine, oxycodone and morphine. 

Doctors are often pressured by patients to prescribe more powerful painkillers when the standard drug treatment of anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen, is not effective. Most doctors are well aware of the problem so if you have been prescribed these drugs or are taking them without a prescription then talk to your GP.

The chiropractic profession, particularly in the US and Canada, has been proactive in raising awareness of this problem. Research has shown that opioid use is much lower amongst back sufferers who go to a chiropractor than those who go to medical doctors alone. People who saw a chiropractor were 64% less likely to use opioids than people who didn’t, researchers report in the journal Pain Medicine.

As the problem becomes more widely recognised, the next decade should see a steady reduction in opioid prescriptions for back pain and the devastating harm associated with them.

3. Chiropractors on the NHS

Physiotherapy in the NHS is not keeping pace with the levels of back pain. Waiting times are huge in some areas, and when you do finally get to see a physio’ you are often given a sheet of exercises and told to go home and do them. Part of this is due to funding but it is also due to the fact that most NHS physiotherapists are not back experts and most doctors are not back specialists either.

The incidence of back pain is likely to rise over the next decade, in line with the ageing population. If the latest government promises are to be believed, then funding on the NHS should rise. But spending more on services where the skills are poor is not going to be the solution. 

In a handful of locations around the UK chiropractors and osteopaths are employed by the NHS in a variety of diagnosis and treatment roles, often as first contact practitioners. Such a system also works in the USA, Canada, Switzerland and Denmark. If the NHS is going to improve back care then it will have to look at existing expertise and use chiropractors and others embedded in hospitals, GP surgeries and in community practices, many of which are up and running already. This sort of approach exists already with NHS and private dentists and podiatrists (thank goodness they changed their name from chiropodists!).

4. Back sufferers finally given a diagnosis

Chiropractic consultation with Brighton chiropractorIf you go to a doctor with a pain in your back, if you don’t have any serious disease or injury, you are most likely to be told that you have non-specific back pain. What this means is that they don’t know which bit of you back is causing the pain and are just going to treat the pain, not the cause. This is a non-diagnosis.

As chiropractors become more common within the NHS patients should be told what the cause of their back pain is likely to be. Differentiating a muscle spasm from sciatica, a disc problem from a pelvic problem is straightforward if you have the training and experience to do so. This improves access to the right treatment and helps people get better faster.

Chiropractors have these diagnostic skills and have been shown in study after study to provide effective back pain treatment. Access to MRI and other imaging techniques directly for the few who need them will speed up diagnosis and free up the GPs to do what they do best – treating things other than back pain. 

5. Ending these dangerous exercises

DeadliftDeadlifts, touching toes and leg press exercises are amongst the drills that will be recognised by the fitness industry as contributing to back pain and will be phased out. Currently, there is a mismatch between most, but not all, spine care experts and gym and yoga instructors. As more up to date research makes its way to the courses for these professions practise will change and fewer back injuries will result.

I hope that these predictions are more than my benign, post-Christmas fug and that they will come to pass. They are all feasible but some are more likely than others. All will improve the lives of the thousands suffering from back pain. 

 

Matthew Bennett

Sundial Clinic Principal

 

Opioid references:

https://www.physiciansweekly.com/chiropractic-care-for-back/

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/opioid-crisis-addiction-drugs-prescription

https://fpm.ac.uk/opioids-aware-clinical-use-opioids/current-uk-data-opioid-misuse

 

Achilles tendon pain? Which type do you have?

Massage on runners calf and Achilles tendonIf you have suffered from Achilles pain in the back of the heel or calf you know how long it can last and how bad it can be. Understanding why you’re getting Achilles pain plays a big role on the road to recovery and prevention.  The pain is often due to Achilles tendinopathy and used to be called Achilles tendinitis; “itis” means inflammation and we now no longer believe that it involves inflammation so we don’t use that term anymore.  Either way, Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most common runners’ injuries that I see at Sundial Clinics here in Brighton. In this series of articles you will learn some of the ways in which you can avoid, treat and manage this common and troubling tendon pain. 

Types of Achilles tendinopathy?

First off, it is important to establish exactly what is causing the problem and exactly what type of Achilles pain you have.  There can be several other reasons why you may be getting Achilles symptoms, but for the purpose of this article, we will concentrate on the most common.

Recent studies have shown that injury rates are as much as 29-58% in new runners. It’s also estimated that 60-70% of running injuries are due to overuse or training error.

In other words, don’t just concentrate on the painful point!  Rehabilitation from an injury can be complicated and unless you’re addressing the root cause of the problem, it’s likely to come back!  This is why seeing a physio can be useful: we can help you to understand the reasons for your symptoms and help you address the imbalance and weakness which may lead to injury.  

 

Diagram of Achilles tendinopathy, tendinitis

Mid Portion Achilles Tendinopathy

The most common cause of Achilles pain is mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy. This commonly affects the Achilles 2-7cm above the bony point at the back of the heel.  Typically, this is likely to appear swollen, be tender to touch and will often cause pain and stiffness first thing in the morning and when weight-bearing.

Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy

This condition is less common but still a prevalent problem that I see in the clinic.  The key difference between the two is that mid-portion tendinopathies are commonly caused by tensile loading and insertional tendinopathies are caused by compression.  

The main presentation for the insertional kind is a pain at the heel bone where the Achilles attaches and pain with the ankle flexed to stretch the tendon i.e. the position of the foot when walking up a steep hill.  This position of the foot is what causes the compression and aggravates the symptoms – and why exercises that exacerbate this should be avoided!

Below I will outline the best way to manage these conditions, along with links to some self-help videos for exercise and pain management.  However, it’s probably worth mentioning at this stage that these are only to be used as a rough guide and if you are unsure about your condition please book yourself in for a physio consultation.  The first appointment is free! And it may help you avoid getting it wrong and potentially delaying your healing time.

Tendinopathy Phases

Now that you have a rough idea of why you have tendinopathy, you now need to figure out what stage of tendinopathy you are dealing with.  To avoid going full physio geek on you, we’ll keep this simple and concentrate on two phases of tendinopathy, the first being the reactive type and the second being the degenerative tendinopathy. 

Phase One – Reactive Tendinopathy

Commonly caused by an increase in loading exercise, for example trying to run faster or further than you’ve ever done before…we’ve all done it!  This will typically cause pain during or after the activity and may be exacerbated first thing in the morning or during weight-bearing activity.  

The key to your management at this stage is to reduce the load that you’re putting through your Achilles and try and calm the symptoms down.  It’s pretty simple: if you carry on doing the same thing at the same pace and effort then you are likely to make it worse!

Phase Two – Degenerative Tendinopathy

At the tender age of 41 and having played sports for most of my life, sadly I would fit into this category.  In fact, I would say it is almost normal to have a degenerative tendon somewhere in your body if you’ve been active for most of your life, especially with high impact sports such as running, football, netball and basketball. So do not fear – this is common!  

Basically, if you’re older and have a previous history of Achilles pain and a grumbly tendon that is prone to flare-ups, it’s likely that you will also fit into this category.  The typical presentation is a thickened tendon, which is painful to touch and is often sore first thing in the morning and during weight-bearing activity. Again, load management is important. If you keep aggravating it, there is potential to make the situation chronic and potentially lead to a partial or full Achilles rupture.

It is also possible to have a reactive, degenerative tendon.  An example of this would be a 60-year-old man who has a history of Achilles pain with symptoms which have been under control for several years, but a recent increase in tennis has caused his degenerative tendon to become reactive.  If this is the case with you, then start your management at the reactive phase i.e. reduce the load, pain management, rehab exercises then graded return to activity.  Tendons are complicated and there is no one recipe for treatment. Finding the right treatment is an important part of your recovery.

Now that we have the geeky part out of the way, let’s look at treatment. Part Two is a step by step guide to recovery for both the mid-portion and insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Click to read it

James Masterson
Physiotherapist

 

Get started today with a free consultation…

Book now

Recent Posts on Sports Injuries …

  • Brighton Half Marathon runners’ offer 5th February 2020 The Brighton Half Marathon is in just over two weeks time and we are entering a team as well as sponsoring the event with our Massage Tent. It might be a bit late to enter if you don’t run regularly as one of our previous team members found out. Becky had never attempted 13.1 miles ...
  • Runners MOT – Brighton Half Marathon 20th January 2020 Running injuries often start with a niggle. Knee pain, muscle strain, tendon pulls, bursitis, ligament sprains and all sorts of other aches and pains are a constant reminder that marathon training and actually running it can be a hazardous business. Many people who enter for the Grand Brighton Half Marathon will not complete it because ...
  • Achilles tendon pain – Step by Step Guide to Recovery 20th January 2020 Achilles tendon pain - Step by Step Guide to Recovery
  • Achilles tendon pain? Which type do you have? 4th December 2019 Achilles tendon pain? Which type do you have?
  • Brighton half marathon recovery tips: how to manage an acute injury 18th November 2019 Brighton half marathon recovery tips: how to manage an acute injury
  • Brighton Half Marathon runners’ offer 27th February 2019 After running the Brighton Half Marathon on Sunday you may still be getting muscle soreness or other aches and pains. Simple muscle soreness will get better over the next few days and massage can help speed this up. If you have a more persistent or painful niggle then you probably want to know whats wrong ...
  • How to manage an acute injury yourself 29th February 2016 “As a physiotherapist this is a question I get asked a lot and having just completed the Brighton Half Marathon you may be asking the yourself the same question.” says Sundial physio James Masterson.  He goes on to say “So in order to help you with your post run recovery here’s a few useful tips to ease you back ...
  • Great stretches for running 10th February 2016 Stretching may help reduce injury and improve flexibility in runners. Most runners include stretches in their routine. It is important to prepare your muscles for a run by gently warming up and keep flexible by doing these stretches. These exercises put together by our physio can help stretch the main running muscles. These stretches should be ...
  • Do I need orthotics for running? 4th December 2014 Why would I need orthotics? Although running shoe design and technology has progressed leaps and bounds over recent years, there are certain foot types that will require more support, explains James Masterson, physio here at Sundial, Brighton.  However not everyone will benefit from orthotics and it’s important to gain professional advice before deciding on whether an orthotic is ...
  • Running shoes – top tips for the marathon season from Brighton physio 27th November 2014 If like me you’re considering starting your preparation for the up and coming marathon season then take a look at my top tips for staying injury free and completing the 26.2 miles with a smile on your face says James Masterson,  a physiotherapist here at Sundial, Brighton. Which running shoe shall I buy? Inappropriate footwear is the root ...

Brighton half marathon recovery tips: how to manage an acute injury

knee-examination-brighton-physioAs a physiotherapist, I get asked how to manage an acute running injury a lot and having just completed training session or race itself you may be asking yourself the same question.  So in order to help you with your post-run recovery here are a few useful tips to ease you back to fitness and training for your next race.

Physiotherapists love an acronym and what used to be known as RICE or PRICE is now often referred to in the industry as POLICE.  With each letter relating to a useful management strategy, this acronym can be a helpful tool in guiding anyone suffering from an acute injury.

Protection:  Depending on the severity of your injury you may want to use a brace, tapping or in more extreme circumstances casts and crutches, this will help to prevent excessive movement and protect the site of injury.

Optimal Loading:  The key part to remember here is OPTIMAL, the right amount of loading will help stimulate the healing process of a muscle, tendon, ligament and bone. This could be any type of activity such as standing, walking or swimming, however in more serious injuries such as fractures or full tendon ruptures the OPTIMAL load might be no loading and may require casting, crutches or surgical intervention.runners-start-vitality-brighton-half-marathon-sm

Ice:  Applying ice during the initial stages of an acute injury can be beneficial for reducing both pain and swelling.  Although medical professionals have been recommending ice for several years the evidence is far from conclusive.  I usually advise my patients to wrap an ice pack in a flannel or thin towel and apply directly on the site of pain for 15 minutes 3 to 4 times daily within the first 72 hours of injury.

Compression:  Similar to ice compression can be used for managing swelling, applying a simple tubigrip or neoprene strap can help to compress the injury site.  The applied compression should be tight but comfortable with good circulation above and below the strapping, I often ask patients to remove the compression for short periods throughout the day and take the strapping of at night to allow the skin time to breath.

Elevation:  Can also be very useful in reducing swelling.  For example, if you’ve acutely sprained your ankle lying on your back with your leg raised and supported can reduce the amount of blood rushing to the affected area.  With this specific injury you may wish to do a few ankle pumps to improve the blood flow and help with the healing process.

At this point, it is probably worth mentioning that I recommend anyone to seek medical advice if you are unsure about an injury.  Although the POLICE protocol is a useful tool for managing an acute injury it is not a one size fits all strategy!!  If you are having difficulty weight-bearing or have symptoms such as bony tenderness, considerable swelling, loss of range of movement or the feeling of instability in a joint then I recommend seeing a medical professional ASAP.

James
Sundial’s Physiotherapist

Sundial is a partner for the Brighton Half Marathon on 23rd February 2020 providing clinical care and advice for sports injuries for the runners. If you have any niggles then give us a call and our physio’s, chiropractors and massage therapists can see you quickly. Sundial Clinics offers a free 20 minute physiotherapy assessment to anyone who would like advice about an injury, this session is a great way to get some useful tips on how best to manage your injury and to see if physiotherapy is right for you. Call for a free Runners MOT

Recent Posts on Sports Injuries …

  • Brighton Half Marathon runners’ offer 5th February 2020 The Brighton Half Marathon is in just over two weeks time and we are entering a team as well as sponsoring the event with our Massage Tent. It might be a bit late to enter if you don’t run regularly as one of our previous team members found out. Becky had never attempted 13.1 miles ...
  • Runners MOT – Brighton Half Marathon 20th January 2020 Running injuries often start with a niggle. Knee pain, muscle strain, tendon pulls, bursitis, ligament sprains and all sorts of other aches and pains are a constant reminder that marathon training and actually running it can be a hazardous business. Many people who enter for the Grand Brighton Half Marathon will not complete it because ...
  • Achilles tendon pain – Step by Step Guide to Recovery 20th January 2020 Achilles tendon pain - Step by Step Guide to Recovery
  • Achilles tendon pain? Which type do you have? 4th December 2019 Achilles tendon pain? Which type do you have?
  • Brighton half marathon recovery tips: how to manage an acute injury 18th November 2019 Brighton half marathon recovery tips: how to manage an acute injury
  • Brighton Half Marathon runners’ offer 27th February 2019 After running the Brighton Half Marathon on Sunday you may still be getting muscle soreness or other aches and pains. Simple muscle soreness will get better over the next few days and massage can help speed this up. If you have a more persistent or painful niggle then you probably want to know whats wrong ...
  • How to manage an acute injury yourself 29th February 2016 “As a physiotherapist this is a question I get asked a lot and having just completed the Brighton Half Marathon you may be asking the yourself the same question.” says Sundial physio James Masterson.  He goes on to say “So in order to help you with your post run recovery here’s a few useful tips to ease you back ...
  • Great stretches for running 10th February 2016 Stretching may help reduce injury and improve flexibility in runners. Most runners include stretches in their routine. It is important to prepare your muscles for a run by gently warming up and keep flexible by doing these stretches. These exercises put together by our physio can help stretch the main running muscles. These stretches should be ...
  • Do I need orthotics for running? 4th December 2014 Why would I need orthotics? Although running shoe design and technology has progressed leaps and bounds over recent years, there are certain foot types that will require more support, explains James Masterson, physio here at Sundial, Brighton.  However not everyone will benefit from orthotics and it’s important to gain professional advice before deciding on whether an orthotic is ...
  • Running shoes – top tips for the marathon season from Brighton physio 27th November 2014 If like me you’re considering starting your preparation for the up and coming marathon season then take a look at my top tips for staying injury free and completing the 26.2 miles with a smile on your face says James Masterson,  a physiotherapist here at Sundial, Brighton. Which running shoe shall I buy? Inappropriate footwear is the root ...

Brighton Half Marathon runners’ offer

After running the Brighton Half Marathon on Sunday you may still be getting muscle soreness or other aches and pains. Simple muscle soreness will get better over the next few days and massage can help speed this up. If you have a more persistent or painful niggle then you probably want to know whats wrong and what to do about it.

We understand how annoying aches and pains can affect your running and can even stop you doing what you love. You don’t have to put up with it.

We’ll give you 50% off your next physio or massage session here at Sundial for all Brighton Half Marathon runners.

  1. Book an appointment for a massage or physio session
  2. Get a customised treatment plan based on our review
  3. Take the first step towards pain free running

50% off your next physio or massage session – Book now

Download Top Tips to Beat Running injuries pdf

We have treated thousands of runners over many years and have been the clinic partner for the Brighton Half Marathon for the last four years.
Achilles tendon massageOur patients say:
A sequence of physiotherapy and home exercises continued over the next few weeks and gradually the condition improved until it completely cleared.
Lee Ashton

He tried various techniques with me to find exactly what worked for me. We tried different physio exercises to build up the strength in my knees and the pain has reduced massively. I am really grateful for his help, and the lovely team at Sundial who are always welcoming and kind.
Charlotte S

50% off your next physio or massage session – Book now

Simple exercises to do at home for heel pain and plantar fasciitis

Here is a video of some simple exercises to do at home to help with heel pain and plantar fasciitis. Do them gently and don’t exceed 4/10 on pain when doing them. If the symptoms are not getting any better then make an appointment with for a check up or with your local physio.

 

To learn more about heel pain and plantar fasciitis go here.

New study slams medical treatment for back pain

backsA new study on back pain in the prestigious medical journal, the Lancet, roundly criticises medical treat of low back pain. Researchers from all over the world took part and looked at how back pain is treated and they concluded that there is “inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections, and surgery.”  They go on to say that “Doing more of the same will not reduce back-related disability or its long-term consequences.”

Back pain is now the number one cause of disability globally and rates have continued to rise in spite of increased spending on treatment. The authors make a plea for more sense and evidence based treatment. They call for a new direction which encompasses emerging treatments alongside effective solutions that exist already.

Effective treatment for back pain

Guidelines exist for doctors to follow on the most effective sorts of treatment but often these are ignored or not implemented properly. Here in the UK, NICE has issued guidelines and these are mentioned in this study as being helpful and they echo the findings in this paper.  The evidence points to a biopsychosocial model of care which looks at the behavioural, psychological, and social factors as well as the anatomical structures which play a role in the persistence of pain and disability. What does this mean for you if you have back pain?

It means that there is greater emphasis on self-management, physical and psychological therapies, and some forms of complementary medicine, and less emphasis on pharmacological and surgical treatments. So staying active, doing gentle exercises, getting some manual therapy as well dealing with stress, anxiety and depression, especially negative feelings around pain and disability, are very helpful. Some guidelines also recommend massage and acupuncture. One thing the guidelines in the US Denmark and UK agree on is that spinal manipulation is helpful. Which is good news because that’s what we do here at Sundial.

The report goes on to highlight the differences in standards of care throughout the world and it is clear that there is huge variance in practise and approach. For instance in the USA only half of back sufferers are prescribed exercises and in Sweden, USA and Australia electrical modalities like ultrasound are routinely used in spite of being ineffective.

Back pain is not one condition

This review is an excellent summary of the worldwide management of low back pain but has its limitations. Back pain is not one condition but several conditions causing a similar group of symptoms. A muscle spasm, disc derangement and a spinal joint dysfunction all cause low back that can refer pain down to the buttock and leg and a skilled clinician can tell which problem it is likely to be. Whilst several conditions can co-exist it is clear that an accurate diagnosis is important because the treatment is different for all three. Here at Sundial we make sure we make an accurate diagnosis and agree a treatment plan that is the most likely to get the best results.

If you would like a free check up to see if we can help your back pain please give us a call or book online above

 

Reference:

Prevention and treatment of low back pain: evidence, challenges, and promising directions

Foster, Nadine EBuchbinder, Rachelle et al.
The Lancet , Volume 0 , Issue 0 ,

21 March 2018

Free physio exercise routine (worth £42) with free spinal check-up

Low back stretchMost people think that having a healthy back is matter of luck, a matter of avoiding accidental injury and bending a lifting properly. Whilst these things certainly help there are three things that research has shown to be the most effective way of treating and preventing back pain.

Firstly, and most importantly, keeping fit and active has the biggest impact on preventing back problems. Initially, a few days rest may help a bad back but getting active early on is key to a full recovery. Once your back is better it is important to maintain levels of activity and there are certain simple exercises that you can do at home. These exercises can also prevent back pain coming on in the first place.

The second thing that will help keep your back in tip top condition is getting treatment sooner rather than later. If back problems are not clearing up or keep coming and going it may be a sign that that the condition is slowly worsening and this can lead to chronic, ongoing pain.

The third solution to keep your back healthy is regular preventative check-ups. Back problems come on because the spinal joints gradually stiffen over time, causing reduced movement, inflammation and pain. We can check for the early signs of spinal stiffness and our treatment can unlock the stiff joints and prevent the pain from coming on in the first place.

For January, we are offering a free spinal check-up with a chiropractor combined with free 30-minute physio assessment and personalised exercise routine (worth £42) for everyone seeing a Sundial chiropractor. To book in online – www.sundialclinics.co.uk or call Sundial Queens Road, 01273 774114

 

Terms and conditions: One free spinal check up and one free physiotherapy exercise session is available on request. To be eligible to claim you must receive a session with a Sundial chiropractor between 2nd – 3rd February 2018. Only one free chiropractic check-up and one free physiotherapy session is allowed per person and it must be taken by 31st March 2018. The free sessions are not transferable and cannot be exchanged for the cash equivalent.