Runners MOT – Brighton Half Marathon

physio or chiropractic for PFS in BrightonRunning injuries often start with a niggle. Knee pain, muscle strain, tendon pulls, bursitis, ligament sprains and all sorts of other aches and pains are a constant reminder that marathon training and actually running it can be a hazardous business. Many people who enter for the Vitality Brighton Half Marathon will not complete it because of injury. We aim make sure you are not one of them.

For the next few weeks we are offering a free Runners MOT especially aimed at runners in the Vitality Brighton Marathon. We want you to be fit, strong and ready to run in support of the Sussex Beacon.

Our physios will check you out top to bottom concentrating on your footwear and leg and foot movements. We will check all the usual things like over-pronation but also things that often over-looked like jamming of the hinge joint of the ankle which changes stride length. We will look at knees, hips and backs too. At the end of our Runners MOT you will have an in depth risk profile of the likelihood of future running injuries and a plan for prevention. If you are having problems currently then we will give you a plan for the best recovery.

So don’t let a niggle turn into a pain, call to make an appointment.

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Running shoes – top tips for the marathon season from Brighton physio

Choosing running shoe, Brighton physioIf like me you’re considering starting your preparation for the up and coming marathon season then take a look at my top tips for staying injury free and completing the 26.2 miles with a smile on your face says James Masterson,  a physiotherapist here at Sundial, Brighton.

Which running shoe shall I buy?

Inappropriate footwear is the root of all evil when it comes to running.  Before embarking on the long and tedious road to the finish line every runner should start with their feet.  Visiting your local running shop for a gait analysis is a good place to begin. As well as being advised on the most appropriate running shoe for your foot type it’s also an opportunity to view yourself in action.  Video analysis taken during these consultations will allow you to look at your lower limb alignment whilst you’re walking and running, giving you a good idea of movement patterns which could potentially lead to overuse injury.

 Top 5 running injuries caused by over use and inappropriate footwear:

1. Plantar fasciitis

2. Achilles tendinitis

3. Medial tibial stress syndrome (aka shin splints)

4. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (aka Runners knee)

5. Iliotibial band syndrome

When it comes to purchasing your shoe it’s likely that you will come across the below terms. Remember it’s not all about what foot type you are!  Take the time to get a feel for the shoe, being able to stand, jump, walk and run before handing over your cash is a great way to find out if the shoe works for you and reduce the risk of injury later in your training.

Useful tips for purchasing your running shoe:

  • Try having a foot analysis in the late afternoon/evening as your feet swell as the day goes on and may give you a false feel when purchasing your running shoes in the morning.
  • Pick a shoe that matches the contour of your arch, you won’t be able to feel this by just standing in them so always make sure you take them for a spin before handing over your cash.
  • Try and have your feet measured before trying on your shoe, this will give the running shoe assistant an idea of the size and width of your foot.  Different brands suit different foot types and not all shoes will equal in size, for example, Nike shoes tend to be good for wider feet and Adidas tend to be better for a narrow foot type.
  • Don’t buy your shoes too small, the fabric will loosen as time goes on but generally if a shoe has hot spots that aggravate your feet whilst trying them out in the shop then it’s likely this will occur during your training.  Remember! Tight shoes equal blisters and potential toenail damage, this will limit the amount you’ll be able to train and will also look horrendous in a pair of flip flops.
  • Lace your shoe up from the bottom up, not just at the top two eyelets!  This allows you to support the shoe around your foot equally and avoids excess movement.  Your heel should fit snug within the shoe and your toes need to have some wriggle room at the front.  A good test for this is to see if you can still scrunch up your toes whilst the shoe is fully laced up.
  • Change your shoes according to your individual usage, most manufactures will recommend that you change your shoe roughly every 300 – 500 miles but this is dependent on so many factors, for example a person’s weight, gait mechanics and running terrain will all play a massive factor in your choice to change your shoes.  Let’s be honest running shoes are expensive, so my advice is look for signs of wear and tear and as soon as the natural cushioning of the shoe starts to depreciate this is probably a good time to start looking for your new runners.

If you have any queries or want more help then book in for a free Runner’s MOT.

Happy running.

Next: Do I need orthotics?

 

 

Benefits of Rock Tape kinesiotaping, Brighton physio Quentin Guichard explains

Rock Tape kinesiotaping has become very popular with good reason at the Olympics. If you, like us, watched the Olympics in every spare moment whilst it was on, you will have noticed athletes wearing different coloured tape.  Usain Bolt wore some on his thigh to help him speed to his historic triple gold medals.  Novak Djokavic had some on his elbow and Serena Williams wore some too.  So what’s the difference between the coloured Rock Tape and normal taping?

How does Rock Tape kinesiology taping work?

The tape is called “kinesiotape” and the theory is that this taping raises the layer of skin and attached tissue covering a muscle, so that blood and other fluids can move more freely in and around that muscle, delaying fatigue. This keeps the athlete performing for a longer period of time. The tape is also used to promote proper form; the tape is applied so that when the muscles become fatigued, the tape helps to keep them in proper form, for longer periods.

What does Rock Tape help?

We use it to encourage proper form in running, swimming, cycling, diving in fact, just about any sports that depends on accurate and specific movement.  This also helps prevent overuse and “tracking” injuries when muscles have become imbalanced, such as Runners Knee.  Anything from back pain and posture problems to tennis elbow can also benefit from kinesiotaping.

This shows video shows Rock Tape being applied

Is there any proof that Rock Tape Works?

The research into this type if taping is in its early days, but there are some encouraging early studies showing performance improvement (1). Judging by the Olympics, the medical teams and their athletes certainly seem to think it helps them achieve their goals!  I am seeing some great results using this tape. We use Rock Tape because we find it is better than other sorts of tape. Here is how Rock Tape explain the difference. If you are getting any joint or muscle problems in your sport, then give me call to book an appointment to see if I can help.
Physiotherapist
References

Do orthotic insoles help with knee pain in runners? Leading Brighton Chiropractor answers

Knee pain is common in runners and a common cause is the patella or knee cap. Pain caused by the patella is often called patello-femoral syndrome or PFS for short. The pain can be severe enough to stop runners going out but also occurs in other sports people and non-sports people alike.

Chiropractor and physio treatment in Brighton

The research on PFS treatment is poor. The studies that have been done are often of poor quality and come up with conflicting results for all sorts of treatment and this can be confusing not only if you are a runner looking for something to help but also if you are a physio or a chiropractor treating these common knee problems.

One of the recent reviews (1) looking at all the evidence for orthotics in the treatment of PFS, sometimes called Runners Knee, found little difference between the groups given orthotics and those given flat insoles which were supposed to do nothing. The other trial which met the criteria compared physio exercises and orthotics. Again not much difference was found between the 2 groups. Delving deeper into the 2 trials reveals why the orthotics groups did not do so well as groups in other trials – but more of that below.

Another study (2) into patello-femoral pain found that orthotics may indeed help. In fact more than three quarters of the runners involved improved. The authors concluded that orthotic or orthoses as they called them may have had a significant effect. This study was excluded from the larger review because it did not meet all the inclusion and exclusion criteria. For example some of the patients were only 12 years old and the study was not a randomised controlled trial.

The difference with this small study and the previous review is that the runners were analysed much more carefully. Their feet, ankles and knees were measured and an orthotic prescribed if they had the right sort of problem.

Chiropractic treatment may help

There are many different causes of PFS. One cause is thought to be over-pronation or excessive flattening of the arch after the heel strikes the ground. If you have over-pronation and it is contributing to PFS then you may respond well to the correct orthotic. If you have PFS from another cause, a weak thigh muscle for instance an orthotic will be a waste of time. In this case a pelvic joint manipulation by a chiropractor may help as in this study (3).

A correct diagnosis of the knee pain is essential for the correct treatment to be applied. A thorough examination should reveal the cause of the problem so that the right treatment can be applied. Too often clinicians use a one size fits all approach that is doomed to fail. This may well also explain why some studies don’t show an improvement whereas others do.

Orthotic buying advice

You can spend a fortune on a custom made orthotic and except in rare cases it is completely un-necessary. Other trials comparing custom made orthotics, often costing several hundred pounds, with much cheaper off-the-peg versions fail to show a difference in the outcome of symptoms.

We have found Superfeet insoles an effective and cost-effective option. They cost between £25-32 and are available on an unconditional money back guarantee from the manufacturer. So even if you don’t have faith that they might work for you it is worth giving them a try but only if you over-pronate. Many running and hiking shops as well as clinics sell them.

For more information you might like to look at a presentation given in June 2011 to the European Chiropractors Conference in Zurich here

Matthew Bennett DC

Sundial chiropractor working with Brighton and Hove Albion and previously with the British Alpine Ski Team.

References

1.Hossain M, Alexander P, Burls A, Jobanputra P. Foot orthoses for patellofemoral pain in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008402. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008402.pub2.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD008402.pub2/full

2.The Lower Extremity 5(2): 95-102, 1998. Copyright © 1998. Reprinted with permission from Elsevier and the American College of Foot and Ankle Orthopedics and Medicine. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association http://www.japmaonline.org/content/93/4/264.abstract

3. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics Volume 22, Issue 3, March-April 1999, Pages 149-153

http://www.jmptonline.org/article/S0161-4754(99)70128-4/abstract

4. A comparison of rearfoot motion control and comfort between custom and semicustom foot orthotic devices. Davis IS; Zifchock RA; DeLeo AT. Journal – American Podiatric Ass, Sep 1, 2008; 98(5): 394-403