Brighton Marathon Top Tips

Jewel runs Brighton Marathon

Brighton Marathon training is in full swing now and we have prepared some top tips to avoid injury whilst training and to make sure you complete the course.

Don’t let a niggle become a pain

Other than normal post training muscle soreness don’t ignore niggles as at this stage of training you can’t afford them to become an injury. Get them checked out by someone. At Sundial Clinics we are offering “Free Runners MOT’s” with our physio Quentin during March and April where we can do some checks and give advice so that problems don’t worsen, become painful, and stop you completing your marathon. We also use RockTape which can help prevent problems.

Run Long

The long run is the most important component of your marathon training and will get you to the finish line as painlessly as possible! It should, by now, make up about 80% of your entire training program.

Use the Right Equipment

Which type of shoes work best for you? What is the mileage on the pair you are wearing? Will they make it through both the training and the marathon? Running shoes lose up to 50% of their shock absorbing ability after about 250 miles of use. You have 2-3 times your body weight going through your foot at every foot strike. That’s about 100 tonnes per mile. If you have foot pain let us check it out.

Consider your clothes. Chafing is a major concern especially during long runs and the marathon so make sure your clothes are tried and tested. Vaseline is a necessity for many
runners to reduce chafing. Also consider how much and what type of clothing you need,depending on the different temperatures and conditions that could occur on a spring day in
Brighton.

Socks are another area to consider. Which type work best for you (i.e. thin, thick, two layers, etc.)? Try out some and find out which suit you before marathon day. Race day is not a time to be trying new equipment! Merino wool based socks are great for temperature regulation and moisture wicking.

Don’t forget to hydrate.

The current advice about running and hydration is very simple — try to drink to thirst. And during long runs and your marathon, you’re going to get thirsty. Also, make sure you’re
rehydrating after your runs — you’ll know you’re hydrated if your urine is a light yellow colour.

Recover and Rejuvinate

As soon as the race is over:

  • Get something to drink.
  • Eat! Carbohydrates replenish depleted energy stores. Fruits, vegetables and salty foods replace essential minerals. Protein enhances muscle repair.
  • Determine if you need any medical attention (aches, pains, blisters, etc.)
  • Gently stretch within 20 minutes of completing the race and twice daily for the week after the race.
  • Keep walking. Sudden stopping or lying down will cause a drop in blood pressure and perhaps fainting, leg cramps, and/or nausea.
  • Get a post-race massage. Also, get a massage or two in the week after the race to help you recover.
  • Get a few laser sessions here at Sundial. It has been shown to improve muscle recovery and tissue healing

Avoid long soaks in hot water which may cause swelling and exacerbate muscle soreness. In the early stages of recovery you are better off to cool your legs by soaking them in cold water which will reduce inflammation.

During the first week of recovery, it is best to avoid running altogether. Instead try walking or swimming each day to loosen your body and promote healing.

Finally, good luck from me with the rest of your training and race day!

More Marathon Trainig Tips

Runners Knee: 2 Most Common Causes

Orthotics and Runners Knee pain

Improve Posture with Dynamic Stretches

Dynamic stretches after exercise is very important, not only to prevent muscle soreness the next day but to also allow the muscles to realign and not remain tight following exertion. However, you should also use dynamic stretches even without doing any physical activity writes  guest contributer and Brighton based personal trainer, Lucy Howlett.

Due to everyday activities; be it standing, sitting for long periods or lifting things regularly, your body will develop areas of tension. This is simply the body’s way of supporting itself, with certain muscles coming into play time after time, becoming shorter and tighter. Your muscles will stay this way unless they’re seen to with some simple dynamic stretches. Further help can be sought from the medical practitioners at Sundial and through classes like yoga, which is fantastic for lengthening muscles, improving flexibility and posture.

Re-aligning posture

To prevent a build up of tension and its visible effects (hunched shoulders, rounded back, neck jutting forwards, short stride length in gait), it is useful to try and integrate some movements that are key to re-aligning the body to optimal posture as well as comfort.

If you are sitting for a long periods of time your hip flexors are prone to becoming tight. This tension can alter your posture and affect your gait, which in turn may lead to injury or pain.

Dynamic stretches to improve posture

Lunge forwards with your left foot in front, allowing both knees to form a right angle and reaching up as high as you can with your right arm (without raising your shoulders). Then step back to a neutral standing position. Repeat this 15-20 times, or until you feel looser at the hip joint. Now change sides. NOTE: To increase the stretch sensation, add a rotation in your torso either towards or away from the front leg. Take care however, as it can have quite a dramatic effect.

Another common complaint, in sportsmen particularly, is tight hamstrings. Instead of the usual static hold you may already know, we will add some movement to allow maximum benefit. Step your left foot backwards leaving the right foot to rock onto the heel, then take your hips back while reaching forwards (towards your toes or out ahead of you). Now step back to a standing position and repeat. Imagine someone is pulling your hips backwards and your hands forwards to get the best stretch!

This dynamic form of stretching is far more beneficial in the long term than the static type; the muscles are naturally stretched in two or three planes of motion so as to trigger contraction back to a position of least effort/tension — we call it centre: you currently know it as neutral.

To support this increased flexibility you should work on your core strength to allow the spine to align well in accordance with the surrounding muscles. Core stability is important to everyone, active or not; it can help to prevent back pain and to have greater control over your stomach muscles, achieving a slimmer and more toned appearance. As well as abs exercises, make sure you work your back and do some twisting movements to encompass all planes of motion that the body goes through.

Through doing these exercises, you should feel a lot less restricted in the lower body and perhaps your upper body as well. Practice daily for maximum results; it may improve your posture, when static or walking, as well as alleviating any niggling pain you have had. These are some of the benefits of dynamic stretching. I hope you enjoy using them!

For any other fitness related questions please do get in touch:

Email: lucyhowlett.pt@gmail.com

Web: www.lucyhowlett.co.uk

Mob: 07879 490373